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How Training Builds Better Business - Part 2

Part 2 of a 5 part series detailing how training can build you a better business no matter what the size or industry with 'Deliver more Deliverables'.

How Training Builds Better Business – Part 2
November 29, 2017 Anya Anderson

Here is Part 2 of our 5 part series on ‘How Training Builds Better Business’. Part 1 which covered ‘Enhancement with the Product’ can be found here

Deliver more Deliverables
A barrier that we’re often faced within the learning and training industry is that of time. ‘We don’t have time for that’ can be a common counter-argument when rolling out training and can be a frustratingly one-dimensional perception of learning. At the same time, what we do find is that once the barrier of time has been overcome (either through self-led realisations, or supportive and empathetic coaching) learning or training becomes part of a routine. Any behavioural routine or structure, workplace or otherwise, allows (or in some cases, forces) a more effective use of time and can actually lead to a higher output with less input. I learnt the hard way how not having routine or structure to manage the hours in a day can lead to overwhelming feelings of task paralysis, and eventually after trial-and-many-many- errors, I learned what works for me. Ironically so because I’m a vegetarian, the mantra I adopted to manage my workload was the answer to the classic question of how to eat an elephant. If you’ve never heard that expression then the answer is… one bite at a time.

We know that bite-sized chunks of learning fits with both cognitive learning theory as well as contemporary lifestyles and technology, but it also serves to help learners (and their coaches for that matter) feel successful because the time-cost isn’t significant. And when learners in an organisation feel successful in one area, that feeling can become contagious spreading to other touch-points in their role, that may be outside of their training objectives. This sense of achievement can increase productivity and motivation, which is why it’s our job as content curators to find a balance between creating high-value learning for our people that’s low-cost (e.g. time-wise, or low-barrier) and beneficial not only to the subject matter but to the wider organisation.

Part 3 of this 5 part series of blogs to come next week! Email me and spark a conversation, debate, or even share a story that you think may inspire others to approach learning and content design from a more holistic perspective.